Mistakes Made On a Raw Food Diet.

1 07 2009

Here are some of the biggest mistakes people make on a raw-food diet:

1. Overeating Acid Fruits

Acid fruits are excellent for health, however, there’s a limit to the acidity that your body can handle. When acid fruits are consumed in excess, the acidity can eat away the enamel of your teeth, or cause other problems.

Many people go on “grapefruit cures” and in just 7 days softened the enamel of their teeth, to the point that they chipped a tooth!

So what is “excess”? It will depend on each person, but usually it’s fairly easy to consume too many acid fruits. So it would be best, on average, to have only a maximum of 2 big oranges per day, or 1 grapefruit, or half a pineapple, or the equivalent.

The fruits to beware are: oranges, pineapple, lemons, and most citrus.

A way to “by-pass” this would be to drink freshly-squeezed orange juice or an orange smoothie, and making sure the acid doesn’t touch your teeth too much (don’t swirl the juice in your mouth). Tip: Using a straw can help you avoid this.

You can also make great smoothies by mixing acid fruits with non-acidic fruits, which is good because the acidity is “tampered” by the other fruits.

2. Eating Dried Fruits

Dried fruits eaten on a regular basis tend to cause two main problems: digestive problems and dental problems.

People who eat dried fruits tend to get a lot of gas, but they also tend to have strong cravings for foods they try to avoid. That’s because dried fruits disturb digestion so much you end up wanting to eat *anything*.

As for dental health, dried fruits won’t do anything to your enamel, but they will stick to your teeth and provide perfect nourishment to the bacteria that cause cavities.

Unfortunately, raw-foodists often rely on dried fruits heavily. These include raisins, dried figs, apricots, and even fresh dates.

It is reccomended to avoid eating dried fruit on a regular basis. Replace these with fresh fruit. Dried fruit should only be eaten occasionally when nothing else is available instead, such as when going on a long trip.

3. Overeating Nuts

When a person goes on a raw-food diet, they tend to eat a lot more fat than what would be optimal. That means a lot of avocados, oils, and nuts.

Problems will show up fast if you decide to eat a lot of nuts. People don’t realize the fact that nuts are not only high in fat, but they are also difficult to digest for most people.

Overeating nuts will leave you tired and fatigued, but there’s also something else. Even though they are rich and filling, when you overeat on nuts you tend to crave all sorts of food and never find balance in your diet!

As a general rule that can be modified depending on the individual,  have a maximum of about 2 ounces of nuts per day, or 3-4 tablespoons of nut butter.

4. Listening to Misleading Advice

A lot of people label themselves “experts” and send out misleading advice to the masses. Usually, the general advice given by most authors is, “Eat anything you want, as long as it’s raw.”

Obviously, this is not a great plan for success.

Recently, the advice is modified to: “Try to figure out what works for you.”

In that case, the “experts” left it to their poor confused readers to go through the hurdles of learning and experimenting…

This is completely unnecessary!

Eating raw is great, and the truth is you don’t have to eat 100% raw or even 90% raw to get some great results! But what you do need is to get the right information.

Avoid the misleading advice of those who are just interested in selling you their new line of supplements. Instead, learn how to tap into the power of raw foods by getting the right information, and you’ll see, it’s much easier than you think, and the rewards will just keep on coming!

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Nut Overdose?

29 06 2009

Don’t Eat Too Many Nuts

Nuts are protein-rich foods. However, protein is not desirable in large amounts. Nuts are actually concentrated with fat rather than extremely high in protein anyway and too much fat is really bad.

Blending nuts with the wrong foods, because of the fact that fat slows digestion, allowing fruits to ferment and cause acid problems, should be avoided.

The Place for Nuts in Our Diets

If you think about it, nuts are seasonal foods. They are only available naturally during specific times of the year. Fresh nuts are only available for a few months out of the year and dried nuts are much higher in fat and protein because they’ve lost their water content.

If you have ever eaten nuts fresh from the tree, you’ll know how much better they taste, how much more satisfying their texture, and how smoothly they grind between our frugivore teeth.

By all means, enjoy a few fresh nuts when they are available. However, limit your consumption to a small quantity and avoid eating them on the same day that you partake in avocado, which is also high in fat.

Children and Pregnant Women

Children have slightly different needs than adults. Children can have some nut products in their diets, but nut milks are the best choice. However, this should be provided to children that are age three or older because nut milk simply doesn’t contain the needed calcium for proper bone growth.

Until three years of age, infants and children thrive on mother’s milk. This is the truly perfect food, designed by nature. Of course, not every mother has the choice of nursing for one reason or another and in that case, animal milk can be used but raw goat’s milk is preferred over other milks.

One of the problems with giving children nuts is ensuring they chew them well. Raw nut butters solve that problem very well. BUT, children should still have most of their energy needs met through fruits and green leafy vegetables so that they obtain all the vitamins and minerals needed for health and rapid growth.

Similar dietary requirements apply to pregnant women because the baby in the womb is growing rapidly.





The Glycemic Index.

24 06 2009

The dietary management of hypoglycemia requires that not only refined but also unrefined sugars and starches with a high glycemic index be removed from the diet. (The glycemic index measures the ease with which the starch is converted into glucose in the body, and estimates the amount of insulin needed to balance it out.) This means no sugar, no honey, no white flour, no whole grains sweetened with honey, no sweet fruits such as watermelons, bananas, raisins, dates or figs. Potatoes are too readily converted into sugar. Jerusalem artichokes are a good substitute.

Glycemic Index (compared to glucose, which is 100)
Grains Fruits Vegetables
all bran 51 apples 39 baked beans 40
brown rice 66 bananas 62 beets 64
buckwheat 54 cherries 23 black-eyed peas 33
cornflakes 80 grapefruit 26 carrots 92
oatmeal 49 grapes 45 chic peas 36
shred. wheat 67 orange juice 46 parsnips 97
muesli 66 peach 29 potato chips 51
white rice 72 orange 40 baked potato 98
white spagetti 50 pear 34 sweet potato 48
whole wheat spagetti 42 plum 25 yams 51
sweet corn 59 raisins 64 peas 51
Nuts Baked Goods Sugars
peanuts 13 pastry 59 fructose 20
sponge cake 46 glucose 100
Meats white bread 69 honey 87
sausage 28 w/w bread 72 maltose 110
fish sticks 38 whole rye bread 42 sucrose 59
Dairy Products
yogurt 36 whole milk 34 skim milk 32