Quote [29]

8 07 2009

If thou live according to nature, thou wilt never be poor;
if according to the opinions of the world, thou wilt never be rich.

(Seneca)





Baby It’s Cold Outside!

8 07 2009

Those that live in the tropics are exposed to a plethora of fresh fruits and vegetables all year long. Unfortunately, not all of us live in those regions.

The Ideal Situation

How can you eat a natural raw diet if you live in cold regions where locally grown fruits and vegetables simply are not available most of the year? While you might really want to move to Hawaii, Florida or Costa Rica where you can get wonderful raw fruit and vegetables that are grown nearby all the time, you may have a job that means you must reside in Canada, Nebraska, or another cold area.

Air travel, thankfully, has made it possible for raw-foodists living in cold climates to obtain imported fresh, natural foods. When it is cold, the body uses more calories to stay warm, so you may find you think you should eat more. That isn’t necessarily true. Those extra calories may come from carbohydrate-rich fruit like bananas.

Must I Eat Only Locally Grown Foods?

Some philosophies, such as macrobiotics, believe that eating exotic or imported foods are unhealthy. This requires a little thought. Because the human diet is designed for humans – all over the world – and many fruits and vegetables that grow in your locale may, in fact, not be indigenous to that region, this idea simply doesn’t make sense.

For an example, let’s look at mangoes. These fruit are tasty, sweet, full of fiber and great for you. They taste grand! And it’s really nice if you can simply walk outside and pull a ripe one from your tree or purchase some from your neighborhood market that are locally grown and harvested ripe. The fruit has the most nutrition this way.

But, for those people that eat imported mangoes that have been stored during shipment, it is still a great food that is tasty, sweet, full of fiber and great for you. In fact, a mango purchased in Montreal could have been picked only a few days before because technology provides such great ways to distribute food to other locales.

In truth, much of the foods that are not healthy, are processed and have additives are much older than that exotic fruit you find in your grocer’s produce section. Of course, it costs energy to transport food, and if you wish to live truly green, you can always choose those fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds that are grown nearby as much as possible and choose to avoid some of the most exotic choices that are grown on the other side of the planet.

In some locations, especially in the long northern winters, local produce is almost nonexistent. Even lettuce is several weeks old. If you have a climate controlled greenhouse, you can grow some of your own food, but most people aren’t in this situation. You can, however, choose to grow fresh sunflower greens which are a fresh green vegetable. It’s simple and easy and very healthy to include these in your diet and you can cut the greens immediately before consumption so they are the freshest and tastiest of winter vegetables.

Handling Cold

There are some people, even raw-foodists that say eating spicy foods, such as those with garlic or cayenne pepper, is a good practice in the winter. However, adding spices to food means that the food is no longer natural, unprocessed and healthy.

In truth, eating these toxic foods does not make a person warmer; they produce the exact opposite. The feeling of “nice and warm” is the body activating your metabolism in order to rid itself of the poison!

Raw-foodists that complain of ‘freezing’ in the winter often eat their foods cold. When food that has been kept in refrigeration is eaten while cold, the body will feel cold. Simply let the food warm up before eating.

Since raw, natural foods do not become rancid like meats do, you can remove from the refrigerator all the food you plan to eat the next day and let it reach room temperature. If you need to eat something straight from the refrigerator, place it in warm water for about ten minutes.

When feeling chilly, exercise can generate warmth. An aerobic session can raise metabolism as much as 10% above the resting rate. This means that if it were possible to work out hard for one hour without dissipating any heat at all, you’d raise you body temperature to 140 degrees Fahrenheit! So, get up and exercise! You’ll feel better, be warmer, and enjoy better health.

Tropical or Temperate Fruits: Which is Better?

There are some people that say that one type of fruit is better than another based on the climate where it was grown. One theory is that tropical fruit is better than fruit grown in temperate areas because our bodies are mot genetically adapted to them. This belief would mean that papayas, mangoes, and bananas would be best while apples, pears and most berries would be less beneficial.

Because there is not any substantial proof that fruit grown in any particular region is better for the human body, I propose that they are all good. Enjoy as wide a variety of raw fruits as is available, depending on where you are and the season.

Some of the most delicious fruits, cherimoya, litchi, jackfruit, durian, and many others, are not well known but as people learn to eat more fruit, more varieties will become available to everyone.

Frozen_Fruit_by_jaydeddesigns





The Bigger Picture.

8 07 2009

Some former raw-foodists ate a healthy, natural raw diet for several years, but went back to the Standard American Diet (SAD) because they constantly experienced cravings or lack of satisfaction.

A diet isn’t right unless it is sustainable. So, the big picture means that healthy food choices must be made, consumed in the right combinations, and it must be satisfying without huge cravings. That is the raw food diet you want to achieve!

Does Raw Always Mean Unheated?

This is a big and important question! The dictionary defines raw as “uncooked” but it also includes “not processed, purified or refined” in the definition. This indicates that raw food is food that is in a natural state – whole fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds in their natural state.

If you think about the definition of “raw”, it is impossible to consider oils, dried fruit, dehydrated crackers and many other items as raw. Think about a can of nuts from the grocery store. First of all, the nuts are usually roasted using oil or coconut butter, and they have salt, and sometimes sugar or other spices, added before packaging.

If raw means unadulterated and natural, would you consider these nuts healthy and part of a raw-foodist regimen? Of course not. The same goes for most nut butters, dried spices, herbs, and frozen fruits or vegetables.

The secret is to avoid becoming a fanatic on the term ‘raw’ and, instead, ask some questions about every food choice:

  • Is this really healthy for me?
  • Do I feel great after eating this food?
  • Is this a specific food for humans considering how humans are designed?
  • Is this a fruit or vegetable?
  • Is this food easy to digest?

You’ll find that a 100% raw food diet means that you’ll eat mostly raw food. You’ll avoid heating foods for the most part. While some have gone long periods of time eating a 100% unheated raw diet, most do not claim to eat 100% raw all the time, nor will they ever achieve that mark.

It’s pretty simple and easy for most people, especially in the summer, to eat only raw foods. They are plentiful and at their prime. But there are times that raw-foodists eat some steamed vegetables.

No one is perfect. The key is to stick closely to the raw-foodist regimen but also to realize that you are only human and not perfect. So, if you feel you simply must have some hot food once in a while or are placed in a situation where eating 100% raw simply isn’t possible that meal, choose some lightly steamed vegetables.

If you simply must have some meat on rare occasions, or if the situation you are in means it isn’t possible to avoid all meat for that meal, select a very small serving eaten with raw vegetables that are non-fat.

When you can’t be 100% raw-foodist for one meal, avoid fat or foods with added fat, because it can be a trigger eating food choices that are much worse! Then, get right back on your regular eating pattern.

Raw is not the only Criterion

We simply must use some common sense and be aware of what food choices we make. It’s better to have some lightly steamed vegetables than to eat a large amount of nuts and seeds. Junk foods, like pizza, chips, anything fried, coffee, ice cream, pastries, and similar foods, are much worse for you than a small piece of meat. If you eat a piece of chicken with a salad, it is better than choosing pizza!

The ideal foods are fresh fruits and vegetables, including fresh nuts and seeds. However, we live in an artificial world. If you must deviate from the 100% unheated raw diet, make rational choices.

Common Mistakes Made by Raw-Foodists

I’ll list for you the most common ways that people sabotage their diets, resulting in cravings and lack of satisfaction with their raw, natural diet:

  • Using salt, condiments, and/or spices
  • Eating too many avocados or eating avocados every day
  • Eating too many nuts or nut butter
  • Worrying or thinking about food continually
  • Drinking too much juice, especially fruit juice
  • Eating concentrated sweets like honey or maple syrup
  • Eating raw cacao – just because it is raw doesn’t mean it is less toxic
  • Thinking that drinking coffee, tea or other caffeine drinks will not sabotage your diet
  • Eating large amounts of sprouted beans and grains
  • Not getting sufficient sleep or sleeping at irregular hours
  • Failing to consider digestion, eating complex mixtures or mixing the wrong foods
  • Eating a raw diet but failing to maintain dental hygiene, including regular check-ups
  • Not getting enough exercise, even if eating a raw food diet
  • Eating too much acid fruit, eating dried fruit; eating dates on a regular basis
  • Using oil regularly
  • Overeating greens by dulling the taste with gourmet salads
  • Failing to pay attention to the body’s signals about hunger, even when eating a raw diet

You’ll find that avoiding these common mistakes will help you feel balanced and healthy. Eat a raw food diet, or one that is very close to 100% raw, natural whole food, but don’t think that this regimen will solve everything, in every case and situation. It is only one factor in maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

A Word of Warning

While eating raw is something that almost anyone can achieve, there are those that have health, mental or physical constitutions not suited to making a sudden change of diet. For these people, as well-planned transition is required. Diets must be adapted to personal needs and no one should conform blindly to an idea without considering these factors. Any competent hygienic practitioner would never recommend a 100% raw diet to everyone immediately in every single case!





Recipes, Juicing and Blending.

5 07 2009

Below are a couple of great sounding recipes for you to AVOID in order to give you some creative ideas about making meals with raw foods. We’ll also discuss blending and juicing and some of the great things you can do with this process which remains natural and raw.

Bad Recipes

The term “combo-abombo” was first used by R.C. Dini, author of Raw Courage World, who defined the term as a combination that is an abomination! It’s a poorly combined recipe, in other words.

Now, raw foods are supposed the best food choices but, because they are not cooked leave a lot to the imagination. And combining the wrong foods can result in gas, stomach upsets and even acid problems.

Not all raw food recipes are healthy. The problem is that many include too many nuts, lots of seeds or avocados and added oils. They may be tasty, but they aren’t what fits into the raw-foodist’s diet is success is to be achieved.

Here’s a recipe that may taste great but is NOT suitable for you. It’s called “Nut Loaf” and imitates meat loaf for dinner. Here’s the recipe and, with what you’ve already learned, you soon see how unhealthy it really is for you:

1 1/3 cups cashews
1 1/3 cups sunflower seeds
1 1/3 cups almonds
½ cup of oil

This creation serves two. Now let’s analyze the content of the nuts and oil used in this recipe. It will make it even clearer why you should avoid using this recipe:

1 1/3 cups cashews or about 150 grams =

69.5 grams of fat

1 1/3 cuts sunflower seeds, about 190 grams =

94.2 grams of fat

1 1/3 cups almonds or about 200 grams =

104.4 grams of fat

½ cup of olive oil which is about 125 grams =

125.0 grams of fat

Total Fat:

393.1

Divided by 2 for two people:

196.55 grams of fat for each person!!

In other words, the entire dish is 100% fat! Totally what the raw-foodist wants to avoid. Low-fat is what is optimal with only about 5% or at most 6% of the dietary calories coming from fat.

If you add salt, spice, soy sauce, miso, onion, garlic, and other oils that taste good to the palate that is not accustomed to eating raw, natural foods, the situation worsens. You’ll only overeat and fail to obtain health and energy.

Good Recipes

Combine a few ingredients that are raw, natural and unseasoned and you can create a great cuisine. The general rules is 5-5-5 which means the dish should require:

  • 5 or less ingredients
  • 5 or fewer minutes to prepare
  • cost less than $5.

What a great deal in time, purchases, and cost.

What about Juicing or Blending?

Juicing, simply squeezing the juice from fruits or watery vegetables, takes almost all the important fiber from the food making it less whole and more refined, therefore it isn’t as good for the body.

Raw-foodists should consume foods as close to nature as possible. This doesn’t mean that you should never juice any food. Blending rather than juicing is much better and creates a similar serving.

There’s a big problem with fruit juice that you should know about. The sugar in fruit juice is absorbed too quickly when separated from the fiber. Blending vegetables into a drinkable food source is much, much better.

Do not drink huge amount of blended green vegetables – a glass or two per day is plenty if you enjoy this way of getting nutrition. Eat the remainder of your food. If the juice has a strong flavor, such as parsley or kale, you can blend some mildly flavored vegetables, such as celery or fennel, into the mixture to dilute the stronger vegetable. You can add some carrot, beet or apple to create a good flavor.

One way to make juice better, if you do wish to juice something, is to add the pulp back into the final product. Drink about 70% of the product as juice, then add the remainder to the pulp and eat this mixture. You can add some chopped vegetables to the mixture and turn it into a tasty creation that is good for you and fits well in your raw-foodist diet.

Smoothies and Blended Food

Green smoothies created in your blender are great for you! You can prepare these in just a minute and create a tasty meal or snack. You’ll quickly learn what combination of vegetables, and perhaps a little fruit, tastes the best to you.

Carrot Juice

Some folks say carrot juice raises blood sugar and has other bad effects. There is no firm evidence of this that I have seen and carrots are a great, nutritious root vegetable. Of course, consuming huge amounts of carrot juice would be detrimental, but so would huge amount of any single food. A mixture of raw foods is needed to obtain the right balance of enzymes, vitamins and minerals.

If you like carrot juice or carrot smoothies, by all means have a glass! But don’t drink a quart, replacing other valuable raw foods by filling up on just carrots.





Quote [28]

3 07 2009

“The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person doing it.”

(Chinese Proverb)





Pizza Bread- Raw!

3 07 2009

Barley Pizza Crust
2 Cups Sprouted Barley
1 1/4 Cup ground Flax Seeds
1/2 Cup Leek (Onion would work too)
2 Celery Stalks
1 Carrot
1 Large Tomato
2 Large Cloves of Garlic
1 tsp Sea Salt
1/2 Cup Water

I mixed the ingredients in the food processor and spread the batter in small circles on teflex sheets. (If you prefer, you could make a couple of large pizza crusts instead.) I dehydrated at 115 for a couple of hours, turned the crusts onto the mesh, then dehydrated at 105 for another 6 hours or so. Yummo!

BarleyCrustAfterW

Carmella’s Notes:
Alissa suggests that you soak the barley (unhulled as pearled barley won’t sprout!) for 6 hours, then let it sprout for a day or so, rinsing often, until the tail is just starting to peek out. For more info on how to sprout barley, go to this site.

For a delicious variation, you can also substitute barley for sprouted buckwheat.





Ravioli- Raw!

3 07 2009

This raw version by Alissa Cohen should stick to your ribs. “This is one of my favorite raw recipes,” explains Cohen. “I often make these at seminars and events and people go wild over them! There is always one person who continues to ask me through the whole event, ‘What kind of pasta is this made from” even after I tell them numerous times that it’s turnip not pasta. It’s hard to believe these are raw!'” AlissaCohen.com

ALISSA COHEN’S RAW RAVIOLI

Wrappers (these replace the pasta dough):

  • 4 turnips

Peal the turnips. Slice the turnips into very thin slices, by cutting them in half and then using a spiral slicer, mandolin or other vegetable slicer to make thin round disks.

Cheese filling:

  • 1 cup pine nuts
  • 1 cup macadamia nuts
  • 1 cup walnuts
  • 6 t braggs
  • 8 t lemon juice
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 cup parsley

Blend the pine nuts, macadamia nuts and walnuts in a food processor until ground. Add the rest of the ingredients and blend well, until creamy.

Tomato Sauce:

  • 2 large tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup sun dried tomatoes
  • 1/4 fresh basil
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 6 dates
  • dash of olive oil (optional)

Soak the sun dried tomatoes until soft. In the food processor, blend the tomatoes, sun-dried tomatoes, basil, and garlic – until well blended . Add the dates and olive oil and blend until smooth. This sauce should be thick.

Directions for Assembling the Ravioli:

  1. Remove a single turnip slice from the batch.
  2. Place a teaspoon full of cheese filling in the turnip slice and fold the turnip over until all the sides meet.
  3. Squeeze the edges together. Some of the filling will ooze out, but this is what will hold the edges together. Just put the excess back into the bowl to reuse. If you don’t have enough filling in them they will not stick together.
  4. Place them in a single layer on a large plate and drizzle the tomato sauce on top, allow to sit for a few hours. The turnip will become soft from the tomato sauce.
  5. To serve, scoop us the raviolis with a spatula.

raw_ravioli_1





Double Chocolate Cherry Cheesecake- Raw!

3 07 2009

Yield one 9-inch cake

Crust:
1 ¾ cups nuts (I used raw almonds)
½ cup raw cacao nibs
1/8 teaspoon Himalayan crystal salt
¾ teaspoon cherry extract
1 tablespoon raw chocolate powder
¾ cup raisins

Filling:
3 cups cashews, soaked 1-2 hours, drained
1/3 cup raw agave
6 dates, pitted
½ cup fresh lemon juice
¼ cup water
2 teaspoons cherry extract
1 cup coconut oil
¾ cup raw chocolate powder

Coulis:
1 bag frozen berries (cherries would be optimal but any will do!)
¼ cup raw agave
dash fresh lemon juice
pinch cinnamon

Crust directions:
Grind the nuts, cacao nibs and salt in a food processor, fitted with the “S” blade, until coarsely ground. Add the cherry extract and chocolate powder and pulse to thoroughly combine. Add the raisins and process until the mixture sticks together when gently pressed between your fingers. Press into the bottom of an 8 or 9-inch round spring form pan. Place in the freezer while you make the filling.

Filling directions: Using a food processor, fitted with the “S” blade, process the cashews, agave, dates, lemon juice, and water until it’s creamy. This could take 3-5 minutes. You might need to stop and scrape down the sides a couple of times. Add the cherry extract, coconut oil, and chocolate powder and process until creamy. Pour the filling into the spring form pan and freeze the cheesecake so it sets. Let thaw for up to an hour or more before eating.

Coulis directions: Blend all of the ingredients together.

chocolate_cheesecake





Quote [27]

3 07 2009

“It’s bizarre that the produce manager is more important to my children’s health than the pediatrician.”

(Meryl Streep)





33 Of The Healthiest Fruits And Vegetables On Earth.

2 07 2009
Pineapple Speeds post-surgery Promotes joint health Reduces asthma inflammation
Blueberries Restore antioxidant levels Reverse age-related brain decline Prevent urinary tract infection
Spinach Helps maintain mental sharpness Reduces the risk of cancers of the liver, ovaries, colon and
prostate
Top nutrient density
Red Bell
Pepper
Reduces risk of lung, prostate, ovarian and cervical cancer Protects against sunburn Promotes heart health
Broccoli Reduces diabetic damage Lowers risk of prostate, bladder, colon, pancreatic, gastric
and breast cancer
Protects the brain in event of injury
Tomato Reduces inflammation Lowers risk of developing esophageal, stomach, colorectal,
lung and pancreatic cancer
Reduces cardiovascular disease risk
Apple Supports immunity Fights lung and prostate cancer Lowers Alzheimer’s risk
Artichoke Helps blood clotting Antioxidant Superfood Lowers “bad” cholesterol
Arugula Lowers birth defect risk Reduces fracture risk Protects eye health
Asparagus Nourishes good gut bacteria Protects against birth defects Promotes heart health
Avocado Limits
liver damage
Reduces oral cancer risk Lowers cholesterol levels
Blackberries Build bone density Suppress
appetite
Enhance fat burning
Butternut
Squash
Supports night vision Combats wrinkles Promotes heart health
Cantaloupe Bolsters immunity Protects skin against sunburn Reduces inflammation
Carrot Antioxidants defend DNA Fights cataracts Protects against some cancers
Cauliflower Stimulates
detoxification
Suppresses
breast cancer cell growth
Defends against prostate cancer
Cherries Alleviate arthritic pain and gout Lower “bad” cholesterol Reduce inflammation
Cranberries Alleviate prostate pain Fight lung, colon and leukemia cancer cells Prevent urinary tract infection
Green
Cabbage
Promotes healthy blood clotting Reduces risk of prostate, colon, breast and ovarian cancers Activates the body’s natural detoxification systems
Kale Counters harmful estrogens that can feed cancer Protects eyes against sun damage and cataracts Increases bone density
Kiwi Combats wrinkles Lowers blood clot risk and reduces blood lipids Counters constipation
Mango Supports immunity Lowers “bad” cholesterol Regulates homocysteine to protect arteries
Mushrooms Promote natural detoxification Reduce the risk of colon and prostate cancer Lower blood pressure
Orange Reduces levels of “bad” cholesterol Lowers risk of cancers of the mouth, throat, breast and
stomach, and childhood leukemia
Pectin suppresses appetite
Papaya Enzymes aid digestion Reduces risk of lung cancer Enhances fat burning
Plums
& Prunes
Counter constipation Antioxidants defend against DNA damage Protects against post-menopausal bone loss
Pomegranate Enhances sunscreen protection Lowers “bad” cholesterol Fights prostate cancer
Pumpkin Protects joints against polyarthritis Lowers lung and prostate cancer risk Reduces inflammation
Raspberries Inhibit growth of oral, breast, colon and prostate cancers Antioxidant DNA defense Lower “bad” cholesterol levels
Strawberries Protect against Alzheimer’s Reduce “bad” cholesterol Suppress growth of colon, prostate and oral cancer
Sweet
Potato
Reduces stroke risk Lowers cancer risk Protect against blindness
Watermelon Supports male fertility Reduces risk of several cancers: prostate, ovarian, cervical,
oral and pharyngeal
Protects skin against sunburn
Banana Increases
Fat Burning
Lowers risk of colorectal and kidney cancer, leukemia Reduces asthmas symptoms in children




Top 5 Super Herbs You Should Be Using!

2 07 2009

1) Pau d’Arco
Pau D’Arco (Avellanedae or Tabebuia Impetiginosa) is the inner bark of a majestic flowering Amazonian tree. The pau d’arco tree grows up to 30 meters in height and the base of the tree can measure up to 3 meters in diameter.

Indigenous people noticed that the pau d’arco tree does not rot, even when it is dead. Pau d’arco bark contains intrinsic chemical factors that fight fungus and mold, even in some of the wettest environments on Earth. This was likely how and why indigenous people started using the bark medicinally to fight fungal conditions.

Pau d’Arco is a wonderful herb with many documented properties and may help provide the following benefits:
• Improves toxic-blood related conditions, such as acne, hepatitis, environmentally produced allergies and asthma, and poisons attacking the liver.
•    Stimulates the immune system to such a positive degree that it has been traditionally used as a primary treatment for viruses, such as flu, herpes or hepatitis.
•    Eliminates Candida, and Candida-type problems from the body as a systemic anti-fungal, by stimulating the body’s own Candida scavengers.
•    Inhibits free-radical induced cell-mutation, especially those within the blood or skin. May also decrease in the spreading of mutated cells and the formation of new malignant growths.
•    Balances blood sugar levels, and reduce the amount of insulin needed by diabetics.

Pau d’Arco teas make a fantastic base to cacao drinks. Simply add cacao beans or nibs and blend. Also adding some form of sweetener (such as raw yacon root syrup, agave cactus nectar, stevia, honey, fruit, etc.) makes a wonderful tasting beverage; yet take note that the more sweetener that is used, the less effective is the pau d’arco.

Pau d’Arco tea possesses a wonderful flavor and has a naturally sweet taste, yet contains no sugar. Pau d’Arco is a great herbal base for all teas. Experiment with mixing it with other herbs.
Dosage: 10 grams makes 1-2 liters of tea. One may add 3.5 grams of the herb cat’s claw to the pau d’arco tea to make a traditional Shipibo Peruvian tea.

NOTE: As with many herbs, an excessive amount of Pau d’Arco tea, may cause cramping, nausea, or intestinal upset. However, there have been no reports in the scientific literature of any danger of ingesting Pau d’Arco tea. Pau d’Arco tea has been in human use for thousands of years.

Pau d’Arco tea recipe:
Pau D’Arco (10 grams)
Cat’s Claw (3.5 grams)
Goji Berries (20 grams)
Chancapiedra (3 grams)
1 raw vanilla bean
(This makes 2 liters of healing tea and is extraordinary when chilled)

2) Vanilla Bean

From the exquisite blooms of the vanilla orchid come the pods that yield one of the world’s greatest flavors. Vanilla beans (pods) are the cured dried fruit of the only fruit-bearing orchid. Although there are about 150 species of vanilla orchids, only a few are used commercially.

Vanilla is one of the oldest and most expensive spices as well as one of the most familiar that is best known for its flavor enhancing qualities as well as its aromatic uses.

Among the purported health benefits of vanilla by ancient peoples was that it could act as an aphrodisiac. In the 1700’s it was recommended by physicians to be drunk as an infusion or tincture to increase male potency.

Studies have shown that vanilla can help people fall asleep faster and enter into deep REM sleep or dream state.

When purchasing vanilla, look for beans that are hand-cultivated and hand-picked without pesticides or synthetic fertilizers, and cured only in the sun. Also, many vanilla beans are blanched in hot water to start the curing process, this is other-than-the-best-ever. Stay away from vanilla extracts, especially artificial vanilla extracts, for when vanilla is processed into this form, it losses it’s health-enhancing herbal properties. Nothing compares to using whole, raw vanilla beans when you want real vanilla flavor!

Suggested use: Use in all your favorite raw creations, including chocolate drinks, smoothies and desserts. If you have a Vita Mix or other powerful blender, you can snip (with kitchen scissors) small pieces of the whole bean right into your blended creations (the beans, flavor and nutrition go further this way). You can also add half of a vanilla bean into any tea recipe along with the other herbs for a delicious and smooth taste. Another way to use vanilla is to split the bean open lengthwise, scrape out the thousands of tiny black seeds and add them to your cuisine.

3) Chanca Piedra

Chancapiedra (Phyllanthus niruri) is one of the most important superherbs discovered in the entire history of herbalism due to its effect on directly fighting calcium-forming organisms called nanobacteria. Nanobacteria have been linked to inflammation and the production of “bad calcium” in the human body. Nearly every disease condition known to humans, mammals, reptiles, and birds involves calcification. Calcification is the overproduction of “bad calcium” due to the growth of nanobacteria.

Chancapiedra’s name means “stone breaker” due to its ability to break up calcium phosphate crystals (bad calcium). This superherb’s historical use in achieving excellent gall bladder and kidney health is well-studied. In South America, Chancapiedra is also known for many other healing properties including helping: malaria symptoms, fever, flu, alleviating liver stagnation, improving digestion, and even as a mild laxative and pain reliever.

Precautions: People with heart conditions or taking prescription heart medications should consult their healthcare practitioner before taking this superherb. This superherb is generally not recommended for those with hypoglycemia symptoms.

4) Chaparral

Chaparral is a desert-growing plant that contains a powerful substance known as NDGA (nordihydroguararetic acid). The active ingredients are found in the leaves which can be soaked in water for an hour; this cold chaparral tea water is then taken internally or applied topically to the skin or hair. Chaparral has also been noted for its ability to ease arthritic pain, and contains potent antioxidants which may act throughout the body to help reduce inflammation.

Suggested Uses for Chaparral:
Make a cold infusion of Noni Leaf Tea and Chaparral. Both Noni Leaf and Chaparral contain a wide range of antioxidants, and work in combination to help protect our cells from free-radical damage. To make an even higher antioxidant drink, use this cold tea as a base for a smoothie or sauce made with Raw Cacao.
Both Chuchuhuasi and Chaparral hold the potential to relieve arthritic pain. Bring 3 cups of water with 2 teaspoons of Chuchuhuasi to a gentle simmer, and let simmer for one hour. At the end of the hour, steep 2 teaspoons of Chaparral in this tea. Let cool to room temperature, strain, and drink slowly throughout the day.

5) Sacha Jergón

Sacha Jergon is one of the main herbs in traditional Amazonian herbalism. Sacha Jergón helps improve the effectiveness of herbs that it is used with and is perhaps one of the best herbs in the world for liver support and rejuvination. This perennial herb grows wild in the Amazon basin up to the lower elevations of the Andes Mountains. The active elements of this herb are found in the tuberous off-white colored root. In its native habitat the root is pulverized in cold water and then drunk immediately for the highest level of therapeutic benefit. This herb earned its name due to its effectiveness in combating snake venom.

Sacha Jergón is as an activator of other herbs as well as a liver rejuvenator. Sacha Jergón provides the key that unlocks the potential of many of the extraordinarily rich herbs of Amazonia. Sacha Jergón can be used in conjunction with any combination of herbs to help improve immunity, cleanse the body, and restore optimal health and well-being.

NOTE: When choosing Sacha Jergon, look for sustainably harvested and wildcrafted products.
Raw Sacha Jergón powder is in a form which may be easily mixed into any juice, smoothie, or beverage. This herb has traditionally been used in cold water infusions, therefore no special preparation is required. Sacha Jergón mixes easily into cold water and has a mildly sweet taste. Sacha Jergón may even be mixed into a smoothie with Raw Cacao Beans to increase the antioxidant and heart-opening effects of the raw chocolate.





Veggie Pizza…Raw!

2 07 2009

Crust

  • 2 cups raw, finely ground almonds (grind prior to use)
  • 3 cups diced, crimini mushrooms
  • 1 cup spinach leaves, chopped
  • ¾ cup diced, broccoli crowns
  • ½ small, red bell pepper chopped
  • ¾ cup diced, white and green onions (combo of both)
  • 5 pieces, softened sun-dried tomatoes
  • 1/8 cup olive oil
  • ¼ cup tahini (or a little less)
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 1/8 tsp. nutmeg
  • ½ tsp. dried thyme
  • ½ tsp. dried tarragon
  • 1 TB Bragg Liquid Aminos
  • 1 TB lemon juice
  • ½ cup water (to help blend)

In food processor, combine all of the crust ingredients. Process until it forms a ball. Spread out on parchment paper lined dehydrator screen. Dehydrate until firm.

Spicy Red Pepper Spread

  • 1 small red bell pepper
  • 6-9 (depending on size) softened sun-dried tomatoes
  • 1 clove garlic, pressed
  • ½ small white onion, chopped
  • sea salt
  • ground cayenne pepper

Blend until thick and creamy.

For this pizza I topped it with zucchini that marinated in a small amount of Nama Shoyu, paprika, and just a pinch of ground chipotle chili pepper. Sliced onions, fresh parsley, and raw pine nuts helped finish the toppings list. You can put on whatever you like.

After pizza crust is firm spoon the red pepper spread on thick.
Top with zucchini, onions, pine nuts and parsley.

raw_pizza





Quote [26]

2 07 2009

“The poets have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese.  ”

(G.K. Chesterton)





Exposing Detox Myths.

2 07 2009

When you begin a raw food diet, you have to break those old habits of high-fat, cooked complex carbs and eating all that huge amount of meat and animal products.

Get Those Toxins OUT!

All the toxins from your old diet are stored in your body. Very few of these are eliminated in wastes and certainly those from the days before you begin the frugivore regimen are still in the body.

We know that habits are difficult to break. If you have ever had a bad habit such as being perpetually late or clicking your tongue and then decided to stop, you know it can be difficult. If you have ever had a really bad habit like smoking or drinking alcohol, then you know it is really, really difficult to stop. It seems the worse the habit, the more difficult to quit. But any habit can be broken.

The body loves habits and doesn’t often approve of change right away. Subsequently, we sometimes feel cravings or urges when we stop a bad habit. Or we may do the action or behavior unconsciously.

When you begin your diet, you might well find you have some cravings for those dense, high-fat, highly processed, cooked and seasons foods. You might find something you shouldn’t be eating in your hand before you even realize what you are doing!

Don’t beat yourself up about these cravings, urges or even a small set-back. You are, after all, human and only human. However, there are simple ways to help your body detox encouraging yourself consciously or unconsciously to slip.

Practical Guidelines

First of all, get enough sleep and some exercise but avoid really hard physical exercise and mental stress until your energy level recovers from the changes in diet. You’ll probably want to change your exercise practices, one you return to hard physical exercise, to muscle building rather than weight loss because the proper, natural raw food diet will maintain your ideal weight quite effectively given time.

Periods of detoxification, tissue repair, growth and healing will occur in the body. Some days you will have tons of energy and others you may have less as the body uses its energy to dispose of toxins.

The myth that this purification process goes on forever is totally false. It really only takes a short time to get all the toxins out of your body after you begin a natural, uncooked, unseasoned food diet that is low in fat.

Of course, if you fail to heed the program and eat all the wrong things, making your diet high fat, even though it may be raw, or if you mix the wrong foods, you may be problems and fail to reach that wonderful goal of great health, abundant energy and a good life.

Lack of Energy

A common complaint by people beginning the raw foods diet is that they lack energy. After only days, your body should have MORE energy; not less. Here are the most common causes of lack of energy when attempting to change to a frugivore diet:

  • Failure to get enough good, sound sleep
  • Using oil in your diet which slows digestion significantly – up to two hours per drop!
  • Eating too many fatty foods such as avocados, nuts or seeds
  • Failure to exercise at all, or to exercise very little. Everyone needs exercise. Of course, heed the warnings that the very first few days, you should avoid too much strenuous exercise. But that doesn’t mean sit in front of the TV 24/7! But over training in the first days is not good for you.
  • Depression, negative thinking or other negative emotional states including high stress situations. Chronic loneliness or anxiety can contribute to this problem.
  • Failure to get fresh air and some exercise. Here we go back to the negative affects to too much TV or sedentary lifestyle.
  • Failure to hydrate with water, fruit juices and healthy liquids.
  • Mixing the wrong raw foods causing indigestion and acid stomach. Anytime you feel bad, you don’t have energy. Eat fatty foods without combining sugary foods. For example, don’t sit down and eat ½ an avocado along with a banana.
  • Using spices, salt or other condiments that are not really raw, natural foods eaten by primates in the animal kingdom.
  • Eating when you are not hungry. This often results, even on a raw food diet, in eating the wrong things or eating too much.
  • Smoking or second-hand smoke.

Because these activities elevate the hormone that results in internal toxemia, you simply won’t feel your best. Listen to the messages your body sends to you!

Prevention

When you don’t feel your best on a raw-foodist diet, analyze recent choices and activities. Identify if any of the risk factors are present. Then, eliminate the cause and rest a little extra for a day or two. But don’t remain sedentary.

What REALLY Isn’t Normal

If you follow the raw-foodist diet for a year or longer and still experience any of the following, you probably should contact a doctor to ensure you aren’t developing a medical condition. Anyone can catch a virus or become ill; it has nothing to do with the raw-food diet. In fact, you’ll experience LESS illness if you follow the techniques outlined in these lessons accurately.

However, if you started your regimen with no serious health issues, yet you either experience the onset of symptoms which last longer than a few days OR you have these symptoms continually, seek medical consultations.

It’s just not normal to continually feel:

  • Tired in the afternoon even though you got enough sound sleep the night before
  • You have little or no energy and don’t feel you are capable of moderate to strenuous exercise on a regular basis (3-5 times per week).
  • You have many ups and downs in energy frequently.
  • You feel worse than before you changed your diet yet you have followed the diet carefully including not eating too much fat or mixing the wrong foods. This applies after the first month or few months of allowing your body to get the toxins from your years of bad diet out of your body.
  • You experience a lot of itching. This could possibly indicate an allergy, existing or new.
  • Your body odor is very strong or changes dramatically.
  • You have frequent headaches or your headaches are especially severe.
  • You have dental problems that didn’t exist previously. If you eat a raw food diet and practice good dental hygiene, your dental exams should be improved, not worse than before!

It’s not abnormal to have a minor headache once in a while or to have a body odor when you exercise and get seriously sweaty. However, when symptoms persist or are extremely severe, please consult a medical practitioner immediately.





Get Your Greens With Blended Salads.

1 07 2009

“it’s hard for me to get more greens in my diet, how can I do it?”

The short answer is, it couldn’t be easier… if you want to. Making your salad the main dish for dinner is a great start… and then start experimenting with different greens. There’s an abundance of green leafy vegetables that you can make into dozens of salads, burritos, wraps and many more.

Here’s a favorite that’s quick, easy and a great way to increase greens in your diet.

Blended Salad

One of the benefits of blended salads is that you can get a large amount of greens into a meal.. and you can be creative with what you add to the mix. Here’s one of my favorite recipes:

(serves 1-2 … adjust accordingly)

  • 3-4 Kale leaves
  • 5-6 Romaine Lettuce leaves
  • 2 Roma Tomatoes
  • 1/4-1/2 Cucumber
  • 2-3 Green Onions
  • Handful of fresh Cilantro
  • 1/2 Avocado
  • Handful Sun Dried Tomatoes
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 1/2 Red Pepper
  • Sprouts (alfalfa, brocolli, etc)
  • Sprouted Pumkin Seeds

Add all ingredients except green onions, red peppers, sun dried tomatoes and avocado into a blender or food processor and blend until you get a smooth consistency. I recommend adding a little at a time and saving the sun dried tomatoes until the end and blend partially to leave small chunks. Top with chopped avocado, green onions, pumpkin seeds, and sprouts and you have a super green meal! You can be creative and make any combination you’d like… toppings, different greens, vegetables, seeds… make a different one every time and have fun!

Enjoy!

By: Mark Idzik





Is It Raw or Not?

1 07 2009

Lets break this down into three categories:  foods to maximize, foods to include some, and foods to minimize or exclude.

On a raw foods diet, you want to maximize your intake  of the following raw food:

  • Fresh fruits and Fresh Vegetables. – Any fresh fruits or vegetables.  The fresher the better. If you can pick the produce yourself, that’s the best. The next best would be  direct from a farmer  or farmers market, next best from a health food store, and last from a “chain store”.   Here is why- once the food is picked, the vitality starts to lessen.  If the produce is refrigerated, the vitality is lessened even further.
  • Fresh Sprouts – you can sprout your own seeds yourself, and eat these life-force rich foods while they are still living and growing!

Next as a raw foodist you may want to consume some of the following: (concentration should be on FRESH fruits and vegetables)

  • Nuts and Seeds – Many nuts are raw and go through no heat processing.  Always purchase nuts in the shell whenever possible, since once nuts are out of the shell, they start to oxidize, and can go rancid.  Some nuts are heat processed in the process of getting the nut out of the shell.
  • Young Coconuts – Young coconuts are a excellent source of electrolytes, the best purified water and a good source of fat and calcium.
  • Dried Fruits- Most dried fruits in the natrual food store are cooked!
  • Dates – Dates are generally sun dried, if good organic dates are purchased.  Many “conventional” dates can be dried and then steamed to make them look “plump” and moist.  The Date People and Flying Disc Ranch are my two good sources.
  • Sea Weeds – Sea weeds such as nori, dulse, Laver, sea lettuce, kombu purchased from a “family” business are usually sundried.   Seaweeds from “asia or china” may or may not be sun dried. Sometimes they are roasted, and it may not be mentioned on the package.  This should be eaten minimally
  • Dried vegetables, herbs and spices for flavoring – I have not checked to see if these are in fact considered “raw” or if they have been heat treated in the drying process. Whenever possible dry your own herbs and spices, and use as sparingly as possible.
  • Olives – You may want to consume some raw olives.   Raw olives are hard to find. The best raw olives are sun dried raw olives, that have not been preserved with salt.  Most olives are preserved with salt.  Most canned olives are cooked in the canning process.   Most olives are packed in a vinegar or lactic acid brine, which I do not recommend.
  • Green Powders – A good green food powder can be helpful as long as it is not heat processed, considered “raw” and dried at a low temperature, and do not include toxic additives.  Some examples would be dried wheatgrass, blue green algae, barleygreen, etc.
  • Raw Honey – I do agree that raw honey is probably the best concentrated sweetener to use, I still reccomend minimizing concentrated sweeteners such as honey.  Get a honey that includes the pollen and propolis, a more “whole” food.
  • Frozen Fruits – It seems that most frozen fruits are not blanched before freezing, so they could be considered “raw”.  Although its best to eat FRESH FRUITS instead, or freeze fruits yourself.

Things to minimize or cut out completely.  The items listed below are many times included in a raw food diet.  They can be helpful while transitioning to a raw food diet, but have no place in a long term health building raw food diet.

  • Table salt and celtic sea salt- While table salt is much worse than celtic sea salt, many raw foodists believe that celtic salt is good for them.  I believe it is not.  This is primarily due to research on the potassium/sodium balance.  Each cell in our body needs to maintain a ratio of sodium to potassium and in the “standard American diet” has the sodium ratio way too high. We get enough sodium from fruits, vegetables and seaweed. (Use seaweed instead)
  • Nama Shoyu and Braggs Liquid Aminos – Once again these items show up often in raw food recipes, and many people think them “healthy”.  Try drinking a bottle of the stuff, and tell me how you feel. I bet you will feel sick to your stomach!  These are highly processed foods that do not occur naturally in nature. (try using seaweed instead)
  • Maple Syrup – Maple syrup is another ingredient considered as “raw” by many.  Based on research, all maple syrup is cooked, so it is not raw..  Use fresh barhi dates (which do taste like maple syrup – there are many different varieties of dates to try!)
  • Agave Nectar – While this “concentrated sweetner” is very popular in raw cuisine, I believe it has no place in a truly “raw” diet.   This is primarily due to the fact that it is a concentrated sweetner.  The “nectar” is collected or “cooked” out of the agave plant, then must be “cooked” or dehydrated down, much like “boiling down” maply syrup.  There is even some rumors about “corn syrup” and other sweeteners being added to “raw” agave nectar to give it the sweet taste. In any case, it is a processed, product, and not a raw, whole food.
  • Wine – Wine can be raw, but while it may have some health benefits – I say drink FRESH made grape juice instead.  Exclude wine from the raw food diet.  Alcohol does kill brain cells.
  • Apple Cider Vinegar – Vinegar contains acetic acid.   Acetic acid  is a toxic chemical. If you drink a whole bottle of vinegar, I bet you wont feel too good.  Did you know acetic acid is used as a pesticide?
  • Bottled oils – Many raw foodists include oils in their diet. This should be minimized for a few reasons.  Oil does not occur naturally in nature.   Once oil is extracted, it generally goes bad (rancid) very quickly.  It is super concentrated and hard for your body to break down.  Try drinking a bottle of oil, and tell me how you feel.  Probably like you want to sleep – its your body having to work overtime to digest the oil.  Yes, even if its cold pressed an organic.  Eat the food instead- i.e.: eat olives instead of olive oil.  Eat coconuts instead of coconut oil. Eat ground flax seeds instead of flax oil.
  • Frozen Vegetables – Confirmation from several major manufacturers of frozen vegetables, frozen veggies are blanched before they are quick frozen, so these would not qualify as raw.




Quote [25]

1 07 2009

“People either pay the price for health or pay the price for sickness”

(Dr Doug Graham)





Mistakes Made On a Raw Food Diet.

1 07 2009

Here are some of the biggest mistakes people make on a raw-food diet:

1. Overeating Acid Fruits

Acid fruits are excellent for health, however, there’s a limit to the acidity that your body can handle. When acid fruits are consumed in excess, the acidity can eat away the enamel of your teeth, or cause other problems.

Many people go on “grapefruit cures” and in just 7 days softened the enamel of their teeth, to the point that they chipped a tooth!

So what is “excess”? It will depend on each person, but usually it’s fairly easy to consume too many acid fruits. So it would be best, on average, to have only a maximum of 2 big oranges per day, or 1 grapefruit, or half a pineapple, or the equivalent.

The fruits to beware are: oranges, pineapple, lemons, and most citrus.

A way to “by-pass” this would be to drink freshly-squeezed orange juice or an orange smoothie, and making sure the acid doesn’t touch your teeth too much (don’t swirl the juice in your mouth). Tip: Using a straw can help you avoid this.

You can also make great smoothies by mixing acid fruits with non-acidic fruits, which is good because the acidity is “tampered” by the other fruits.

2. Eating Dried Fruits

Dried fruits eaten on a regular basis tend to cause two main problems: digestive problems and dental problems.

People who eat dried fruits tend to get a lot of gas, but they also tend to have strong cravings for foods they try to avoid. That’s because dried fruits disturb digestion so much you end up wanting to eat *anything*.

As for dental health, dried fruits won’t do anything to your enamel, but they will stick to your teeth and provide perfect nourishment to the bacteria that cause cavities.

Unfortunately, raw-foodists often rely on dried fruits heavily. These include raisins, dried figs, apricots, and even fresh dates.

It is reccomended to avoid eating dried fruit on a regular basis. Replace these with fresh fruit. Dried fruit should only be eaten occasionally when nothing else is available instead, such as when going on a long trip.

3. Overeating Nuts

When a person goes on a raw-food diet, they tend to eat a lot more fat than what would be optimal. That means a lot of avocados, oils, and nuts.

Problems will show up fast if you decide to eat a lot of nuts. People don’t realize the fact that nuts are not only high in fat, but they are also difficult to digest for most people.

Overeating nuts will leave you tired and fatigued, but there’s also something else. Even though they are rich and filling, when you overeat on nuts you tend to crave all sorts of food and never find balance in your diet!

As a general rule that can be modified depending on the individual,  have a maximum of about 2 ounces of nuts per day, or 3-4 tablespoons of nut butter.

4. Listening to Misleading Advice

A lot of people label themselves “experts” and send out misleading advice to the masses. Usually, the general advice given by most authors is, “Eat anything you want, as long as it’s raw.”

Obviously, this is not a great plan for success.

Recently, the advice is modified to: “Try to figure out what works for you.”

In that case, the “experts” left it to their poor confused readers to go through the hurdles of learning and experimenting…

This is completely unnecessary!

Eating raw is great, and the truth is you don’t have to eat 100% raw or even 90% raw to get some great results! But what you do need is to get the right information.

Avoid the misleading advice of those who are just interested in selling you their new line of supplements. Instead, learn how to tap into the power of raw foods by getting the right information, and you’ll see, it’s much easier than you think, and the rewards will just keep on coming!





A Raw Foodist’s Mistake- Dry Fruit.

1 07 2009

Did you know that most dried fruits in the natural food store are COOKED?

Yes!! They are.   Manufacturers and distributors of dried fruits and even “dried tomatoes” were asked the temperature at which their product is dried.   Usually it is well over 200 degrees. They say this proudly, because its not too feasible to dry products at an acceptable temperature to a raw foodist (around 118 degrees or less) because there would be an inconsistent and “ugly” looking product.

Usually only “sun dried” foods would be considered “raw” since they are dried by the sun. So why not dry your own?

How to Dry Fruits and Vegetables

Food dehydration is safe because water is removed from the food. Because water is removed from the food, mold and bacteria cannot grow on it;thus it will not spoil. There is, however, a loss of vitamin A and C in dried foods due to heat and air. It usually takes vegetables 6-16 hours to dry, and fruit 12-48 hours. One can dry fruit and vegetables, and make jerky and fruit leather.

Choose Which Drying Method is Right For You

  • Sun Drying. This is rather difficult because you need three to four sunny days of at least 100 degrees in a row.
  • Oven Drying. Oven drying is an acceptable method of drying food, but it isn’t very energy efficient, and foods aren’t very flavorful in the end. If your oven cannot obtain temperatures below 200 degrees farenheit, use another method for food dehydration. You will need to prop open the oven door to maintain air circulation during the drying process.
  • Electric Dehydrating. This is the best method of dehydrating food. An electric dehydrator is energy efficient and can be operated at low temperatures needed to maintain nutritive values in the food. Your electric food dehydrator should have some sort of heat control and a fan to maintain air circulation during the drying process.

The Drying Process

When drying food, don’t keep temperatures too low or too high. Temperatures too low may result in the groth of bacteria on the food. Temperatures too high will result in the food being cooked instead of dried. Food that is underdried will spoil, and food that is overdried will lose its flavor and nutritive value.

Food should be dehydrated between 120 and 140 degrees Fahrenheit. You can begin drying your food at higher temperatures, but turn the temperature down after the first hour or so. The last hour or so of drying time should be turned down on a lower setting. You must turn the food and rotate the trays while the food is drying.

You will know your food is dried when when you touch it, and it is leathery with no pockets of moisture. If you are testing fruit, you can tear a piece in half. If you see moisture beads along the tear, it is not dry enough. Vegetables should also be tough but can also be crisp.

When storing your dried product, keep in mind that no moisture should be allowed to enter the container…ever. Dried food absorbs moisture from the air, so the storage container must be airtight. Some acceptable storage containers are jars and plastic freezer bags. If storing fruit leather, wrap in plastic wrap and store in a another airtight container. Store your containers of dried food in a cool, dark, dry place. 60 degrees Fahrenheit or below is best.

Vegetable Drying Guide

All vegetables except onions and peppers,and mushrooms should be washed, sliced, and blanched. Dry vegetables in single layers on trays. Depending of drying conditions, drying times make take longer. Dry vegetables at 130-degrees Fahrenheit.

  • Beans, green: Stem and break beans into 1-inch pieces.Blanch. Dry 6-12 hours until brittle.
  • Beets: Cook and peel beets. Cut into 1/4-inch pieces. Dry 3-10 hours until leathery.
  • Broccoli: Cut and dry 4-10 hours.
  • Carrots: Peel, slice or shred. Dry 6-12 hours until almost brittle.
  • Cauliflower: Cut and dry 6-14 hours.
  • Corn: Cut corn off cob after blanching and dry 6-12 hours until brittle.
  • Mushrooms: Brush off, don’t wash. Dry at 90 degrees for 3 hours, and then 125 degrees for the remaining drying time. Dry 4-10 hours until brittle.
  • Onions: Slice 1/4-inch thick. Dry 6-12 hours until crisp.
  • Peas: Dry 5-14 hours until brittle.
  • Peppers, sweet: Remove seeds and chop. Dry 5-12 hours until leathery.
  • Potatoes: Slice 1/8-inch thick. Dry 6-12 hours until crisp.
  • Tomatoes: Dip in boiling water to loosen skins, peel,slice or quarter. Dry 6-12 hours until crisp.
  • Zucchini: Slice 1/8-inch thick and dry 5-10 hours until brittle.

Fruit Drying Guide

All fruit should be washed,pitted and sliced. Arrange in single layers on trays. Dry fruit at 135 degrees Fahrenheit. You may wish to pretreat your fruit with lemon juice or ascorbic acid or it won’t darken while you are preparing it for drying. Just slice the fruit into the solution and soak for 5 minutes.

  • Apples: Peel, core and slice into 3/8-inch rings, or cut into 1/4-inch slices. Pretreat and dry 6-12 hours until pliable.
  • Apricots: Cut in half and turn inside out to dry. Pretreat and dry 8-20 hours until pliable.
  • Bananas: Peel, cut into 1/4-inch slices and pretreat. Dry 8-16 hours until plialbe or almost crisp.
  • Blueberries: Dry 10-20 hours until leathery.
  • Cherries: Cut in half and dry 18-26 hours until leathery and slightly sticky.

  • Peaches: Peel, halve or quarter. Pretreat and dry 6-20 hours until pliable.

  • Pears: Peel, cut into 1/4-inch slices, and pretreat. Dry 6-20 hours until leathery.
  • Pineapple: Core and slice 1/4-inch thick. Dry 6-16 hours until leathery and not sticky.
  • Strawberries: Halve or cut into 1/4-inch thick slices. Dry 6-16 hours until pliable and almost crisp.

a_clockwork_orange_by_lisalyn